Black holes are the blackest things in the universe. Because of their enormous, space-bending gravity, everything that falls into them is instantly ripped apart and lost. Scientists have never seen a black hole, because nothing, not even light, can escape them.

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The supermassive black hole in question lies at the center of a galaxy called SDSS J1354+1327, about 800 million light-years from Earth, and it seems to be making meals of gas released by a companion galaxy. It has apparently released two burps of gas more than 100,000 years apart.

You can see them here.

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In this post I want to totally set aside the fact that this is a conundrum for any believer in the ever expanding universe that resulted in a single big bang that was more than 13 billion years ago (you know, because it is either evolving or dying… you can’t have both).

Regardless, let’s move on.

Sunlight travels at the speed of light. Photons emitted from the surface of the Sun need to travel across the vacuum of space to reach our eyes. The short answer is that it takes sunlight an average of 8 minutes and 20 seconds to travel from the Sun to the Earth. According to modern day Copernican cosmology he sun is approximately 93 million miles away. With that said, it takes light a little over 8 minutes to travel the outrageous distance of 93 million miles.

So then, what is a light year?

A light year is about 5.9 trillion miles, the distance that light travels in vacuum in one Julian year (365.25 days). That would equal 31,557,600 seconds per year. If you divided the time it takes light to travel from the sun to the earth over the course of one year,  5.9 trillion miles.

Basically, we are to believe that we have the ability to view objects that are a total distance of 5.9 trillion miles x 800,000,000. These numbers are so ridiculous that the calculator breaks the answer down. That is how many miles away we are told that those burps are as they escape the inescapable.

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According to science our visual acuity extends far beyond the horizon despite the fact that the horizon is only about 4 miles away from the observer. If Earth were flat, or if you were standing atop a mountain surveying a larger-than-usual patch of the planet, you could perceive bright lights hundreds of miles distant (disregarding atmospheric disturbances). On a dark night, you could even see a candle flame flickering up to 30 miles away. But don’t worry, with X-Ray Vision we can see for infinity!

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The reason why this junk sounds like science fiction is because… well, it is. But hey, don’t take my word for it. Here is a wonderful simulation. All the proof you will ever need!

The funny thing here is that people don’t even stop and actually consider these things. Instead we just buy into their nonsensical numbers and unrealistic time-lapse and gasp in awe and wonder as we watch the universe expand before us in illustration form.

In short… black holes have never been seen, but when we are seeing something we have never seen we can watch something escape that can never escape while happening a hundred thousand years ago from so many miles away that the math becomes shorthand formula rather than traditional math with the aid of something out of retro comic books.

Here is the question…

When is my smart phone going to get that camera?

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